Know Where You Live

Know Where You Live

View Know Where You Live

http://www.hackdays.com/knowwhereyoulive/

Contest Winner
Excellence in Mashing
Created by
Know Where You Live (Eric Auld, David Lewis, Simon Wright)
data.australia.gov.au datasets used
Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006 Census NSW Crime Data Powerhouse Museum Collection (flickr) State Records Office NSW (flickr) State Library of New South Wales Collection (flickr)

Know Where You Live is the prototype of a data mashup that displays a range of Australian Government data based on your geographic location along with a Google satellite map and relevant photo from the Powerhouse Museum Collection, the State Records NSW or the State Library of New South Wales collection. The initial prototype was created in under 24 hours as part of the inaugural Govhack event in Canberra in October, 2009.

Judges' Comments: This entry bills itself as a prototype of a mashup of a range of open access government data based on postcodes so that you can truly know where you live. The judges loved the very citizen-centric “common questions” user experience of this app and the groovy, and again, selective repackaging of what could otherwise be considered (we’ll be honest here) slightly boring data. The integration of publicly-held historical photographs and rental price data was a nice touch as was the use of Google’s satellite images in the header. Judges were disappointed that some of the data for states other than NSW wasn’t available for inclusion. The focus on compliance only with the most modern standards compliant browsers was not seen as detrimental to this mashup.

9 Responses to “Know Where You Live”

  1. Adam Kennedy says:

    When looked at with the right browser (“right” being Safari, IE is groing to break a lot) this is by far the prettiest and most seredipitous entry in the competition.

    It is mainly let down by low geographic coverage and browser compatibility though.

    But regardless of these faults, I love it because it has set the bar for all supposedly “good looking” websites to meet, and it helped ram through to me that I am REALLY not a designer and I really should either not try, or make sure we recruit a proper designer to any competition team.

    • Eric Auld says:

      Hey Adam – The coverage has actually increased to all of NSW (the front page needs a text change) and down to actual postcode level rather than just LGA.

  2. Eddie says:

    What’s with the overkill on the visuals?

    This is a perfect example of how websites or web applications should not be built.

    Design Breaks in all IE versions.
    crashes in chrome and firefox.

  3. Gavin says:

    I saw this presented at govhack in Canberra – I thought it was great then, and I love now.

    I’m using firefox on a mac, and it works 100%.

    The visual design is the strong point of this app. I think the developers made the right decision to ignore IE and to go for a design that works well and looks great in standards compliant browsers.

    IE has been the bane of web developers for years – if I could ignore it I would. Within this competition, I think its totally appropriate to show ‘what should be’ rather than fit the lowest common denominator. Anyone viewing these entries should be familiar with the shortcomings of IE, and prepared to use an alternate browser.

    My comments on the design here aren’t meant to take away from the visual presentation of the data. The integration of the various datasources seems well done – and does provide a good snapshot of a suburbs stats. The integration of the google satellite map, and the archive image add excellent contextual interest to the page. These are really important elements that make boring ‘datasets’ interesting to general punters.

    All the entries here should aim to look as good as this.

  4. Eric Auld says:

    Gavin – Thanks for the support and everything you say is true. Our main goal of Know Where You Live is to “make boring ‘datasets’ interesting to general punters”, which meant make it visual and easy to use.
    This also meant that we focused on later browsers that have all the visual impact and for other browsers to visually degrade.
    For the best experience, use browsers with webkit ie. Safari or Chrome.

    Eddie – It should work fine with Chrome and have a slight visual degrade with Firefox (we didn’t get any crashes with our testing). We know IE is not the best experience, but that should improve when we have time to iron out the bugs. After all this is still just a prototype.
    But please get in touch with us through the site and tell us how it is crashing for you. Without feedback we can’t fix it.

  5. Peter Mcphee says:

    Practical, but too many like it.

  6. h says:

    Engaging content and slick design. For mashups to really grab the attention of people in govt and the general public, we need more like this.

  7. Di E says:

    I’m having trouble running this with Chrome.

  8. […] Know Where You Live which bills itself as a prototype of a mashup of a range of open access government data based on postcodes so that you can truly know where you live. The judges loved the very citizen-centric “common questions” user experience of this app and the groovy, and again, selective repackaging of what could otherwise be considered (we’ll be honest here) slightly boring data. The integration of publicly-held historical photographs and rental price data was a nice touch as was the use of Google’s satellite images in the header. Judges were disappointed that some of the data for states other than NSW wasn’t available for inclusion. The focus on compliance only with the most modern standards compliant browsers was not seen as detrimental to this mashup. […]